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Homes for sale Coral Springs Florida
Coral Springs, Florida
City of Coral Springs
Downtown Coral Springs in January 2019
Downtown Coral Springs in January 2019
Flag of Coral Springs, Florida
Flag
Official seal of Coral Springs, Florida
Seal
 
Official logo of Coral Springs, Florida
Motto(s): 
“Everything Under the Sun!”[N 1]
Location in Broward County and the U.S. state of Florida
Location in Broward County and the U.S. state of Florida
Coordinates: 26°16′14″N 80°15′33″WCoordinates26°16′14″N 80°15′33″W
Country United States of America
State Florida
CountyLogo of Broward County, Florida.svg Broward
IncorporatedJuly 10, 1963
Government
 • TypeCommission-Manager
 • Acting Mayorand Vice MayorSkip Campbell and Lou Cimaglia
 • CommissionersJoshua Simmons, Joy Carter, and Larry Vignola
 • City ManagerMichael Goodrum
 • City ClerkDebra Dore Thomas
Area
 • Total23.99 sq mi (62.12 km2)
 • Land22.86 sq mi (59.22 km2)
 • Water1.12 sq mi (2.91 km2)
Elevation13 ft (3 m)
Population 
 • Total121,096
 • Estimate 
(2017)[4]
133,037
 • Density5,818.62/sq mi (2,246.56/km2)
Time zoneUTC-5 (EST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)
Zip Codes
33065, 33067, 33071, 33073, 33075, 33076, 33077
Area code(s)754 and 954
FIPS code12-14400[5]
GNIS feature ID0307614[6]
Websitewww.CoralSprings.org

Coral Springs, officially the City of Coral Springs, is a city in Broward CountyFlorida, United States, approximately 20 miles (32 km) northwest of Fort Lauderdale. As of the 2010 United States Census, the city had a population of 121,096.[7] It is a principal city of the Miami metropolitan area, which was home to an estimated 6,012,331 people at the 2015 census.

The city, officially chartered on July 10, 1963, was master-planned and primarily developed by Coral Ridge Properties, which was acquired by Westinghouse in 1966. The city’s name is derived from the company’s name, and was selected after several earlier proposals had been considered and rejected.[8] Despite the name, there are no natural springs in the city; Florida’s springs are found in the central and northern portions of the state.[9]

During the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s the young city grew rapidly, adding over 35,000 residents each decade. Coral Springs has notably strict building codes, which are designed to maintain the city’s distinctive aesthetic appeal. The city government’s effective fiscal management has maintained high bond ratings, and the city has won accolades for its overall livability, its low crime rate, and its family-friendly orientation.

Coral Springs is a planned community. Prior to its incorporation as a city in July 1963, the area which is now Coral Springs was part of 20,000 acres (81 km2) of marshy lands bought by Henry Lyons between 1911 and 1939. After several floods in 1947, Florida created the Central and Southern Florida Flood Control District (now the South Florida Water Management District). Canals and levees drained much of the area upon which Coral Springs was built. After the land was drained and cleared, most of the area was used as a bean farm. After Lyons’ death in 1952, his heirs changed the focus to cattle.[8]

A post-World War II real estate boom in South Florida attracted the interest of developers. Coral Ridge Properties, which already had several developments in Broward County, bought 3,869 acres (16 km2) of land from the Lyons family on December 14, 1961 for $1 million.[8] The City of Coral Springs was chartered on July 10, 1963. Other names that were considered for the new city included “Curran Village,” “Pompano Springs” and “Quartermore”. By 1964, the company had developed a master plan for a city of 50,000 residents. On July 22, 1964, the first sale of 536 building lots netted $1.6 million. The landmark covered bridge was built that same year to promote the town. In 1965, Coral Ridge Properties bought an additional 6,000 acres (24 km2) from the Lyons family, increasing the city’s land area to 16 square miles (41 km2). The first city government elections were held in 1967.

The city added 19 public schools, a regional mall, shopping centers and parks between 1970 and 2000 in response to rapid population growth. The construction of the Sawgrass Expressway in 1986 brought even more growth. A museum and a theater opened in the 1990s. The city reached residential build-out in 2003[10] and is very close to a commercial build-out.[11]

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